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image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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image: Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

Fish Transport Fukushima Radiation

By | May 28, 2012

Radioactive particles from the Fukushima nuclear disaster provide an unexpected way to track migratory marine species.

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image: Food's Afterlife

Food's Afterlife

By | May 25, 2012

Meals left to mold develop colors, mycelia, and beads of digested juices, sparking the eye of an artist, and the slight concern of a mycologist.

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image: DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

DNA to Nab Illegal Fishers

By | May 24, 2012

A new SNP assay can determine the geographical origin of commonly overexploited fish species.

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image: Wet Weather Stymies Insects

Wet Weather Stymies Insects

By | May 21, 2012

The rainiest April in 100 years is keeping many insects from flourishing in the United Kingdom.

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image: Synchronized Clocks

Synchronized Clocks

By | May 16, 2012

Researchers identify the first circadian clock component conserved across all three domains of life.

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image: How Prawns Lure Prey

How Prawns Lure Prey

By | May 15, 2012

Orange-loving Trinidad guppies are curiously attracted to orange spots on prawn pincers, which may make it easier for the predators to snatch them up.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 15, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Can Fish Eco-Labeling be Trusted?

Can Fish Eco-Labeling be Trusted?

By | May 14, 2012

Programs that provide sustainable certification for fisheries may be too generous with their accreditation.

3 Comments

image: Ocean Plastic Aid Insects

Ocean Plastic Aid Insects

By | May 10, 2012

Floating pools of plastic debris in the Pacific offer more surfaces for marine insects to lay eggs.

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