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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Cave Dwellers, 1938

Cave Dwellers, 1938

By | March 1, 2016

Renowned sleep researcher Nathaniel Kleitman and a colleague spent a month underground to test the body’s natural rhythms.

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image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: The A B Zzzzs

The A B Zzzzs

By | March 1, 2016

An overview of the human sleep cycle

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image: A Month in Mammoth

A Month in Mammoth

By | March 1, 2016

Two sleep researchers braved the subterranean environment of a Kentucky cave to see if they could train their bodies to abandon the cyclical rhythms of the 24-hour day.

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image: Circadian Clock and Aging

Circadian Clock and Aging

By | February 3, 2016

Whether a critical circadian clock gene is deleted before or after birth impacts the observed aging-related effects in mice.

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