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» circadian clocks and evolution

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2011

First Life, Radioactivity, Brain Bugs, Life of Earth

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image: Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

By | August 1, 2011

A guide to free software for constructing and assessing species relationships

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image: The First Plant Interactome

The First Plant Interactome

By | July 28, 2011

Protein interaction networks in Arabidopsis give clues to plant evolution and immunity.

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image: On the Origin of Birds

On the Origin of Birds

By | July 27, 2011

The discovery of a new bird-like fossil challenges longstanding theories about which species of dinosaur gave rise to the avian lineage.

24 Comments

image: Electric Dolphins?

Electric Dolphins?

By | July 27, 2011

Like many fish and amphibians, the Guiana dolphin can sense low levels of electrical activity in the water—an ability not previously reported in true mammals.

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image: Latitude Affects Human Eye Size

Latitude Affects Human Eye Size

By | July 27, 2011

People living near the Earth’s poles, where days are often short and light often low, have larger eyes and visual cortices than those closer to the equator.

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image: Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

By | July 25, 2011

Unlike human brains, chimpanzee brains don’t get smaller as they age, suggesting that pronounced neurological decline is a uniquely human byproduct of our oversized brains and extreme longevity.

33 Comments

image: Neanderthal DNA in Modern Humans

Neanderthal DNA in Modern Humans

By | July 19, 2011

Non-African people carry remnants of the Neanderthal X chromosome, suggesting interbreeding with early human ancestors.

51 Comments

image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

27 Comments

image: Repainting Ancient Birds

Repainting Ancient Birds

By | July 1, 2011

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.

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