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» circadian clocks and evolution

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image: Circadian Signs of Aging

Circadian Signs of Aging

By | July 13, 2011

The neural nexus of the circadian clock shows signs of functional decline as mice age, providing clues as to why sleep patterns tend to change as people grow older.

27 Comments

image: Repainting Ancient Birds

Repainting Ancient Birds

By | July 1, 2011

Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.

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image: Thymus Finder

Thymus Finder

By | July 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Immunology

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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

12 Comments

image: Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

By | July 1, 2011

Member, Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: Color by Number Fossils

Color by Number Fossils

By | June 30, 2011

Researchers map pigments in early bird fossils using preserved metallic residues.

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image: Warm-Blooded Dinos?

Warm-Blooded Dinos?

By | June 24, 2011

Evidence that large dinosaurs had body temperatures similar to modern-day mammals suggests they were either endothermic or extremely good at conserving body heat.

3 Comments

image: Escape Predators, Get Parasites

Escape Predators, Get Parasites

By | June 24, 2011

A particular predator defense used by water fleas makes them more susceptible to parasite infections, new research shows.

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image: Behavior brief

Behavior brief

By | June 23, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research.

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image: Bigger spores = badder infection

Bigger spores = badder infection

By | June 17, 2011

Larger spores of a deadly fungal pathogen cause more virulent infections in mice.

3 Comments

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