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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nosing Around

Nosing Around

By | November 1, 2016

Covering neuroscience research means choosing from an embarrassment of riches.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

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image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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