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image: Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?

Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?

By | May 22, 2013

Researchers find that reducing mitochondrial protein production in some animals can increase lifespan by activating a protective stress response.


image: Viruses Prefer the Cold

Viruses Prefer the Cold

By | May 20, 2013

Chilly weather could impede the immune reactions that most effectively contain viruses like the common cold.  


image: Protective Phages

Protective Phages

By | May 20, 2013

Viruses that attack bacteria may be an important component of our gut microbiota.


image: Clock Genes Linked to Depression

Clock Genes Linked to Depression

By | May 15, 2013

Patients with major depressive disorder appear to have malfunctioning circadian rhythms, which could lead researchers to new avenues for treatment.


image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes


image: Anti-Malarial Mosquitoes?

Anti-Malarial Mosquitoes?

By | May 9, 2013

Artificially induced bacterial infections in mosquitoes could reduce the spread of malaria-causing parasites.


image: Fat Hormone Controls Diabetes

Fat Hormone Controls Diabetes

By | May 8, 2013

A small protein produced by fat cells appears to regulate blood sugar levels, potentially revealing a new way to treat diabetes.


image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside


image: Easy Jump for H5N1 from Bird to Mammal

Easy Jump for H5N1 from Bird to Mammal

By | May 2, 2013

Hybrid viruses derived from an H5N1 bird flu strain can infect guinea pigs through the air.

1 Comment

image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.


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