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image: Fuel Gauge

Fuel Gauge

By | May 1, 2014

An optical reporter quantitatively measures the ATP demands of presynaptic neurons.

2 Comments

image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: Psychiatry: An SOS Call

Psychiatry: An SOS Call

By | May 1, 2014

Social policies shaped the practice of psychiatry in the past. As the discipline becomes ever more scientific, the effects of social policy on patient well-being must not be ignored.

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image: The Crowd Takes On the Computer

The Crowd Takes On the Computer

By | May 1, 2014

Gangs of nonexperts are outperforming science’s best efforts at automating biological problem solving.

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image: The Energizer

The Energizer

By | May 1, 2014

György Hajnóczky uncovers the chemical and physical strategies by which mitochondria communicate and function within a cell.

3 Comments

image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

1 Comment

image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

1 Comment

image: Your Brain on Art

Your Brain on Art

By | May 1, 2014

A new scientific discipline investigates the neurology underlying the experience and the creation of beauty.

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image: Neuroaesthetics

Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

1 Comment

image: The Art of Brain Damage

The Art of Brain Damage

By | May 1, 2014

Artist Katherine Sherwood discuss how suffering a cerebral hemorrhage affected her work.

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