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image: Amoeba Eats Cells Alive

Amoeba Eats Cells Alive

By | April 9, 2014

The intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills host cells by tearing pieces from them, which it then eats.

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image: Bridging Two Worlds

Bridging Two Worlds

By | April 4, 2014

Lynne Quarmby’s love of the natural world inspires her to explore beyond her cell biology lab through art.

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image: Lynne Quarmby - Artist

Lynne Quarmby - Artist

By | April 4, 2014

The professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at Simon Fraser University is also an accomplished painter.

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image: Week in Review: March 31–April 4

Week in Review: March 31–April 4

By | April 4, 2014

Transcriptional landscape of the fetal brain; how a parasitic worm invades plants; difficulties reproducing “breakthrough” heart regeneration method; oxytocin and dishonesty

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image: The Structure of Flowers

The Structure of Flowers

By | April 4, 2014

Architecture student-turned-artist Macato Murayama creates beautiful images inspired by the intricate anatomy of flowers.

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image: Mouse Brain Connections Mapped

Mouse Brain Connections Mapped

By | April 3, 2014

Achievement represents the most detailed analysis of the mouse brain yet.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: The Right to Not Know

The Right to Not Know

By | April 2, 2014

Patients should be able to decline learning about incidental genetic findings when undergoing whole-genome screens, according to new expert recommendations.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

1 Comment

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