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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Photonic Colored Creatures

Photonic Colored Creatures

By | February 1, 2013

Animals and plants come in a dizzying array of colors. Current research is cracking into the remarkable structures behind nature's artistic display.

1 Comment

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

4 Comments

image: Killer Kittens

Killer Kittens

By | January 31, 2013

Domestic cats kill billions of birds and mammals every year, making them a top threat to US wildlife.

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image: Modeling All Life?

Modeling All Life?

By | January 28, 2013

A proposal to simulate all of Earth’s ecosystems is exposing a rift between small and big ecology.

5 Comments

image: Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

Cities Affect Global Weather Currents

By | January 28, 2013

The heat emanating from large metropolitan areas may be changing weather patterns thousands of miles away.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.

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image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

1 Comment

image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.

3 Comments

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