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image: That Loving Feeling

That Loving Feeling

By | July 1, 2014

There are no FDA-approved drugs to treat low sexual desire in women, but not for lack of trying.

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

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image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

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image: Running Mice Regain Vision

Running Mice Regain Vision

By | June 27, 2014

Exposure to visual stimuli while running restores vision to mice blind in one eye. 

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The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.

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image: Omnivore Ancestors?

Omnivore Ancestors?

By | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.

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image: Speeding Up Antiviral T Cell Production

Speeding Up Antiviral T Cell Production

By | June 25, 2014

Scientists come up with a simpler, more efficient strategy for making multivirus-targeting T cells for immunotherapy.

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image: Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

Evolving Antibiotic Tolerance

By | June 25, 2014

E. coli repeatedly exposed to ampicillin adapt to stay dormant for longer periods of time—just long enough to outlast the antibiotic treatment.

1 Comment

image: FDA Approves Another New Antibiotic

FDA Approves Another New Antibiotic

By | June 24, 2014

Second new drug to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus approved under US Food and Drug Administration incentive program. 

1 Comment

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