The Scientist

» disease/medicine and evolution

Most Recent

image: Evolutionary Biologist Dies

Evolutionary Biologist Dies

By | January 2, 2013

Carl Woese, the discoverer of the third domain of life, has passed away at age 84.

0 Comments

image: A Dime a Dozen

A Dime a Dozen

By | January 1, 2013

Affordable diagnostic tests tackle the world’s most pressing health problems.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Dawn of the Deed

Book Excerpt from The Dawn of the Deed

By | January 1, 2013

In the final chapter of his book on the origins of vertebrate sex, author and paleontologist John Long pays homage to the humble placoderm, which got the erotic ball rolling.

0 Comments

image: Games for Science

Games for Science

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.

7 Comments

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

1 Comment

image: Sex and the Primordial Ooze

Sex and the Primordial Ooze

By | January 1, 2013

The rise of copulation as a vertebrate reproductive strategy may have driven crucial evolutionary change and explosive species radiation.

2 Comments

image: Steal My Sunshine

Steal My Sunshine

By | January 1, 2013

How photosynthetic organisms get taken up, passed around, and discarded throughout the eukaryotic domain

6 Comments

image: Evolution by Splicing

Evolution by Splicing

By | December 20, 2012

Comparing gene transcripts from different species reveals surprising splicing diversity.

1 Comment

image: Science and Politics in 2012

Science and Politics in 2012

By | December 19, 2012

This year, US politics was dominated by the run-up to October elections, with science policy issues playing a role here and elsewhere around the world.

1 Comment

image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham