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image: Skipping Pluripotency

Skipping Pluripotency

By | September 14, 2011

Researchers are developing ways to convert mature somatic cells from one cell type to another, avoiding the tumor-causing pluripotent stage associated with stem cells.

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image: Are All Stem Cells The Same?

Are All Stem Cells The Same?

By | September 14, 2011

Proteins in induced pluripotent stem cells and human embryonic stem cells are 99 percent similar.

3 Comments

image: Same School, New Infection?

Same School, New Infection?

By | September 14, 2011

For the second time in two years, a University of Chicago researcher falls ill to a laboratory-acquired infection.

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image: Fish Oil Blocks Chemo

Fish Oil Blocks Chemo

By | September 13, 2011

New research suggests that fish fat can prevent chemotherapy drugs from doing their job.

9 Comments

image: Fluorescent Cats Aid Research

Fluorescent Cats Aid Research

By | September 13, 2011

Tiny, adorable and…green? Glowing kittens may answer questions about neurobiology and disease.

39 Comments

image: Top 7 in Aging Research

Top 7 in Aging Research

By | September 13, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in aging research and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

3 Comments

image: Lasker Winners Announced

Lasker Winners Announced

By | September 12, 2011

Discoveries in protein folding and malaria treatment are recognized by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation.

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image: Duke Sued for Cancer Trial

Duke Sued for Cancer Trial

By | September 12, 2011

Cancer patients and families of deceased patients filed a lawsuit against Duke University for clinical trials based on flawed data.

3 Comments

image: The Toll of 9/11

The Toll of 9/11

By | September 11, 2011

People exposed to the dust cloud from the World Trade Center collapse still suffer from health problems.

48 Comments

image: Get Your Gut Sequenced

Get Your Gut Sequenced

By | September 8, 2011

A new non-profit endeavor is calling for people to get their gut bacteria sequenced for the sake of science.

15 Comments

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