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image: Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

By | August 1, 2013

Crescent, An Empty Land of Plenty, Prophet of Bones, and Equilateral

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image: Contributors


By and | August 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Finding the Way

Finding the Way

By | August 1, 2013

A focus on the movements of species and disciplines through space, time, and minds

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image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.


image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.


image: Keeping Up with Climate Change

Keeping Up with Climate Change

By | July 24, 2013

In order to adapt to this century’s changing temperatures, vertebrates will need to evolve much faster than in previous eras.


image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

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image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism


image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.


image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.


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