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image: 2014’s Best in Multimedia

2014’s Best in Multimedia

By | December 28, 2014

The Scientist’s standout videos and slideshows of the year

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image: 2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

2014’s Most “Liked” Images of the Day

By | December 24, 2014

The best of The Scientist’s popular daily image posts

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image: Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

Brain-Machine Interface Goes Wireless

By | December 18, 2014

A paralyzed woman has used mind power and a robotic arm wirelessly connected to her brain to achieve the most dexterous movement yet accomplished with BMI.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

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image: Bird Genomes Abound

Bird Genomes Abound

By | December 11, 2014

Scientists complete the largest-ever comparative genomic study of birds.

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image: Evolution in Oil Droplets

Evolution in Oil Droplets

By | December 9, 2014

For the first time, researchers have mimicked biological evolution using chemicals instead of living organisms.

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image: Big Data and the Brain

Big Data and the Brain

By | December 8, 2014

Advances in imaging have inundated neuroscientists with massive amounts of information on synaptic connections, among other things. The challenge now is to understand it all.

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image: Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

Shoring Up Golgi To Slow Alzheimer’s

By | December 8, 2014

Blocking activity of a kinase in a mouse model protects Golgi in cells and reduces the build-up of amyloid β, a primary component of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Bat Navigation Revealed

Bat Navigation Revealed

By | December 4, 2014

As the flying mammals navigate complex environments, they make use of specialized brain cells that cooperate to build a coordinate system that works in three dimensions.

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