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» invasive species and neuroscience

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image: The Body Electric, 1840s

The Body Electric, 1840s

By | November 1, 2014

Emil du Bois-Reymond’s innovations for recording electrical signals from living tissue set the stage for today’s neural monitoring techniques.

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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: A Face to Remember

A Face to Remember

By | November 1, 2014

Once dominated by correlational studies, face-perception research is moving into the realm of experimentation—and gaining tremendous insight.

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image: Neuroprosthetics

Neuroprosthetics

By , and | November 1, 2014

Linking the human nervous system to computers is providing unprecedented control of artificial limbs and restoring lost sensory function.

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image: Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

By | October 29, 2014

Allison Doupe, a neuroscientist known for her work exploring the neural mechanisms of learning, has passed away.

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image: Still There

Still There

By | October 20, 2014

Researchers identify brain activity patterns that may indicate when an unresponsive patient is conscious.

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image: Neuro-Insights into Holding It

Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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image: Week in Review: October 13–17

Week in Review: October 13–17

By | October 17, 2014

Snail not extinct after all; results too good to be true?; mice need myelin production for motor learning; keeping the brain young; the evolution of archaea

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image: Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

Myelin’s Role in Motor Learning

By | October 16, 2014

The production of new myelin in the brain—a function of non-neuronal glial cells—may be necessary for motor learning, a mouse study shows.

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image: Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

By | October 15, 2014

The brain’s ability to make new neural connections can be restored in mice by blocking a protein that normally acts as a natural brake on neuroplasticity. 

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