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» invasive species, culture and neuroscience

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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: A Lot to Chew On

A Lot to Chew On

By | June 1, 2014

Complex layers of science, policy, and public opinion surround the things we eat and drink.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2014

Proof, Caffeinated, A Sting in the Tale, and The Insect Cookbook

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image: Carpe Carp!

Carpe Carp!

By | June 1, 2014

Can putting invasive species on the menu contain troublesome animals and plants?

5 Comments

image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

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image: Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

Nutrient-Sensing Neurons

By | June 1, 2014

Using just three dopaminergic neurons, Drosophila larvae can sense whether a food source lacks a full roster of essential amino acids.

1 Comment

image: Simultaneous Release

Simultaneous Release

By | June 1, 2014

Coordinating the submission of manuscripts can strike a healthy balance between competition and collaboration.

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image: Speaking of Food Science

Speaking of Food Science

By | June 1, 2014

June 2014's selection of notable quotes

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