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image: Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List

Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List

By , , , , and | August 15, 2017

Although the popular blacklist of predatory publishers is gone, the suspect journals they produce are not. 

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These institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.

3 Comments

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

Website Flags Wrongly Paywalled Papers

By | May 31, 2017

Thousands of open access papers have mistakenly asked readers to pay access fees, but publishers are correcting the errors. 

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image: Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

By and | May 10, 2017

We suggest a centralized facility for submitting to journals—one that would benefit scientists and not only publishers.

3 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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