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image: Smallest Cas9 Ortholog Reported

Smallest Cas9 Ortholog Reported

By | February 23, 2017

Researchers demonstrate the delivery of AAV-packaged CRISPR-CjCas9 into the muscles and eyes of mice.

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image: Speaking of Science Policy

Speaking of Science Policy

By | February 21, 2017

Notable quotes from the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting

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image: Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

By | February 8, 2017

Need help explaining CRISPR, epigenome, or rock snot? The Merriam-Webster dictionary has you covered.

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image: Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

By | January 23, 2017

Researchers generate an organism that can replicate artificial base pairs indefinitely.

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image: USPTO to Hear Arguments on CRISPR Patents

USPTO to Hear Arguments on CRISPR Patents

By | December 5, 2016

Tuesday morning, the US Patent and Trademark Office will hear oral arguments from the two parties that claim to have been the first to use CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology in eukaryotic cells.

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image: Scientists Can’t Replicate Gene-Editing Method

Scientists Can’t Replicate Gene-Editing Method

By | November 21, 2016

Even with the original authors’ vector, the NgAgo technique doesn’t work in others’ hands.

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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

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image: Gene Editing: From Roots to Riches

Gene Editing: From Roots to Riches

By | October 1, 2016

Advances in genetic manipulation have simplified the once daunting task of rewriting a gene.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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