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image: Gene Editing: From Roots to Riches

Gene Editing: From Roots to Riches

By | October 1, 2016

Advances in genetic manipulation have simplified the once daunting task of rewriting a gene.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Treating Cancer with CRISPR?

Treating Cancer with CRISPR?

By | June 17, 2016

A federal panel will review the first proposal for the use of the technology to edit human genes for medical purposes.

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Researchers use a gene editor to introduce an allele that eliminates the horned trait—and thus, the need for an expensive and painful process of dehorning—in dairy cows.

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image: Gene Editing Treats Leukemia

Gene Editing Treats Leukemia

By | November 6, 2015

One-year-old Layla Richards has remained cancer-free months after receiving an experimental gene editing therapy.

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image: Gene-Edited Pets

Gene-Edited Pets

By | October 2, 2015

Genomics giant BGI announces plans to sell “micro-pigs” it originally developed for research.

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image: New Way to Edit Genes

New Way to Edit Genes

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers develop a more-efficient method for rewriting DNA that could hold therapeutic value for HIV and other diseases.

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image: Erasing Mitochondrial Mutations

Erasing Mitochondrial Mutations

By | April 23, 2015

Researchers develop a method to selectively remove mutated mitochondrial DNA from the murine germline and single-celled mouse embryos.

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image: Engineering TB-Resistant Cows

Engineering TB-Resistant Cows

By | March 3, 2015

Scientists add a mouse gene to the cow genome to ward off bovine tuberculosis.

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image: A CRISPR Fore-Cas-t

A CRISPR Fore-Cas-t

By | March 1, 2014

A newcomer’s guide to the hottest gene-editing tool on the block

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