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image: Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

By | June 10, 2015

Researchers in Africa observe chimpanzees stealing palm wine from villagers’ cups and imbibing the beverage.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Binge-Drinking Trigger?

Binge-Drinking Trigger?

By | May 12, 2015

Researchers identify a protein linked to excessive consumption of alcohol in animal models.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Drunk Monkeys

Drunk Monkeys

By | March 1, 2015

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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