The Scientist

» circulating tumor cells

Most Recent

image: Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature

Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature

By | April 18, 2016

Clusters of tumor-derived cells can pass through narrow channels that mimic human capillaries, scientists show in vitro and in zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: Turning Tumor Cells Against Cancer

Turning Tumor Cells Against Cancer

By | February 8, 2016

In mice, cancer cells genetically modified to express an anticancer cytokine home to tumors and can reduce their growth. 

2 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2015

Top 10 Innovations 2015

By | December 1, 2015

The newest life-science products making waves in labs and clinics

0 Comments

image: Direct-to-Consumer Liquid Biopsy

Direct-to-Consumer Liquid Biopsy

By | September 13, 2015

Some doctors advise shoppers to be skeptical of a newly marketed cancer diagnostic.

0 Comments

image: Toward Blood-based Cancer Detection

Toward Blood-based Cancer Detection

By | July 7, 2015

Circulating tumor cells, exosomes, and DNA can improve the diagnosis of many cancers. But are liquid biopsies ready for prime time?

1 Comment

image: Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

By | June 1, 2015

Novel microfluidic devices give researchers new ways to count and sort single cells.

0 Comments

image: Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

By | April 1, 2014

Three approaches for isolating and characterizing rare tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream

2 Comments

image: Search and Destroy

Search and Destroy

By | April 1, 2014

Turning a patient’s immune cells into cancer-fighting weapons

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Cannibalism: Not That Weird
    Reading Frames Cannibalism: Not That Weird

    Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

  4. Can Plants Learn to Associate Stimuli with Reward?
Business Birmingham