The Scientist

» embryogenesis and culture

Most Recent

image: The NSF Shake-Up

The NSF Shake-Up

By | September 7, 2012

The federal agency is shuffling around its programs to streamline management and promote international scientific collaboration.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Hour Between Dog and Wolf</em>

Book Excerpt from The Hour Between Dog and Wolf

By | September 5, 2012

In his latest book, author John Coates describes the tension and exultation of the trading floor from a biological perspective.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2012

Wired for Story, Dreamland, Homo Mysterious, and Vagina


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2012

September 2012's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: A Story Biological

A Story Biological

By | September 1, 2012

Using scientific information as narrative can be a powerful way to communicate.


image: Gifted in Science

Gifted in Science

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers look to the emerging phenomenon of "crowdfunding" to pay for their work

1 Comment

image: Of Frogs and Embryos

Of Frogs and Embryos

By | September 1, 2012

Associate Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, John Wallingford, makes his living using cutting-edge microscopic techniques to watch developmental events unfold in real time.


image: Taking the Long View

Taking the Long View

By | September 1, 2012

In exploring how embryos take shape, John Wallingford has identified a key pathway involved in vertebrate development—and human disease.


image: Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

Glass Shape Speeds Drinking

By | August 31, 2012

The shape of the glass holding your favorite brew can affect how quickly you get drunk.


image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.


Popular Now

  1. Investigation Finds Pathologist Guilty of Systemic Misconduct
  2. Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia
  3. Misconduct Finding Could Impact PubPeer Litigation
  4. Common STD May Have Come from Neanderthals