The Scientist

» embryogenesis and culture

Most Recent

image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

image: Military Mind Wars

Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

image: Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

By | November 1, 2012

On the bicentennial of his birth, Edward Lear is celebrated for his whimsical poetry and his stunningly accurate scientific illustrations.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | November 1, 2012

November 2012's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Truth and Consequences

Truth and Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

Studying the consequences of behavior has shed light on a wide range of life-science phenomena, pathological as well as everyday.

2 Comments

image: Life Sciences Salary Survey 2012

Life Sciences Salary Survey 2012

By | November 1, 2012

Researcher salaries continue to buck the trend of the millennium’s first decade, remaining flat or even declining across most life science disciplines.

2 Comments

image: Life Science Salaries

Life Science Salaries

By | November 1, 2012

Check out the breakdown of this year's Salary Survey data, including how compensation differs between sex, sector, and state.

0 Comments

image: Natural-Born Doctors

Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS