The Scientist

» embryogenesis, ecology and disease/medicine

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image: Fears over Fast-Tracking Drugs

Fears over Fast-Tracking Drugs

By | September 10, 2012

Doctors question whether a government initiative to speed approval for promising new drugs is ensuring safety.

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image: Robot Legs Obey Brain

Robot Legs Obey Brain

By | September 7, 2012

A pair of mechanical leg braces that are controlled by their wearer’s brain signals could help paralyzed patients walk again.

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image: A Funding Reboot

A Funding Reboot

By | September 5, 2012

Scientists ask the NSF to reconsider a granting mechanism they say could hurt junior faculty.

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image: Dogs Improve Beach Sanitation

Dogs Improve Beach Sanitation

By | September 4, 2012

Canines that chase away seagulls have been helping to reduce the amount of bird droppings, which can carry disease and lead to beach closures.

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image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

3 Comments

image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

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image: Of Frogs and Embryos

Of Frogs and Embryos

By | September 1, 2012

Associate Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, John Wallingford, makes his living using cutting-edge microscopic techniques to watch developmental events unfold in real time.

4 Comments

image: Pleasant to the Touch

Pleasant to the Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Scientists hope an understanding of nerve fibers responsive only to gentle touch will give insight into the role the sense plays in social bonding.

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image: Taking the Long View

Taking the Long View

By | September 1, 2012

In exploring how embryos take shape, John Wallingford has identified a key pathway involved in vertebrate development—and human disease.

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image: From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

By | August 31, 2012

Salt compounds produced by plant and fungus species help form organic aerosols that form clouds and produce rain.

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