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Top 10 Innovations 2015

By | December 1, 2015

The newest life-science products making waves in labs and clinics

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image: A Weighty Anomaly

A Weighty Anomaly

By | November 1, 2015

Why do some obese people actually experience health benefits?

3 Comments

image: Nourishing the Aging Brain

Nourishing the Aging Brain

By | March 1, 2015

Research reveals how the brain changes as we age and hints at ways to slow the decline.

3 Comments

image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

3 Comments

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Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Cadherin Connection

Cadherin Connection

By | December 1, 2014

A multitasking plasma membrane protein coordinates cell division and energy metabolism in healthy—and perhaps also cancerous—Drosophila cells.

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image: Muscle to Mind

Muscle to Mind

By | September 25, 2014

Exercise-induced muscle metabolites protect the brain from stress-induced depression in a mouse model. 

2 Comments

image: The Energizer

The Energizer

By | May 1, 2014

György Hajnóczky uncovers the chemical and physical strategies by which mitochondria communicate and function within a cell.

3 Comments

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