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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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image: Bird Rests Both Brain Hemispheres During Flight

Bird Rests Both Brain Hemispheres During Flight

By | August 8, 2016

Great frigatebirds can sleep while flying, researchers report.

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image: Brain Listens During Sleep

Brain Listens During Sleep

By | June 15, 2016

People continue to hear and process words during light non-REM sleep, a study shows.

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image: Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

By | June 13, 2016

Autonomic nervous system activity during sleep may help explain variation in the extent to which the behavior aids memory consolidation, a study shows.

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image: Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep

Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep

By | April 21, 2016

The first night people sleep in a new place, one of their brain hemispheres remains somewhat alert, a study shows.

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image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

By | March 1, 2016

Unearthing the root causes of narcolepsy keeps Emmanuel Mignot tackling one of sleep science’s toughest questions.

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image: Learning with the Lights Out

Learning with the Lights Out

By | March 1, 2016

Researchers are uncovering the link between sleep and learning and how it changes throughout our lives.

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image: Perchance to Dream

Perchance to Dream

By | March 1, 2016

Mapping the dreaming brain through neuroimaging and studies of brain damage

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