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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

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image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

Viral Demise of an Algal Bloom

By | August 21, 2014

Marine viruses may be key players in the death of massive algal blooms that emerge in the ocean, a study shows.

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image: Microbes in a Tar Pit

Microbes in a Tar Pit

By | August 8, 2014

Microdroplets of water in a natural asphalt lake are home to active microbial life, a study shows.

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: Metagenomics Mash-Up

Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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image: Seeing Red

Seeing Red

By | August 1, 2014

Reef fish, once thought to be unable to see red wavelengths, not only fluoresce deep red, but males of some species react to seeing their own bioluminescent pattern.

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