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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

10 Comments

image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

2 Comments

image: Tenacious Termites

Tenacious Termites

By | February 1, 2014

Formosan subterranean termites evade deadly pathogens by building nests lined with their own feces.

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image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.

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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

2 Comments

image: Shrimp Sight

Shrimp Sight

By | January 24, 2014

Although mantis shrimp eyes have twelve different photoreceptors, the crustaceans have a hard time distinguishing colors, according to a new study.

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

6 Comments

image: Gene Therapy Improves Sight

Gene Therapy Improves Sight

By | January 17, 2014

Patients progressing toward blindness now have better vision after a gene therapy trial.

0 Comments

image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

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