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Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

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Speaking of Sex

By | July 1, 2014

July 2014's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: To Study Unfettered

To Study Unfettered

By | July 1, 2014

Researching the causes of sexual orientation should be guided by scientific, not social, concerns.

5 Comments

image: Running Mice Regain Vision

Running Mice Regain Vision

By | June 27, 2014

Exposure to visual stimuli while running restores vision to mice blind in one eye. 

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image: Review: “What Lies Beneath”

Review: “What Lies Beneath”

By | June 23, 2014

An exhibit at the newly opened SciArt Center in New York City showcases work that explores hidden worlds.

0 Comments

image: Light-Sensing Retina in a Dish

Light-Sensing Retina in a Dish

By | June 10, 2014

From human induced pluripotent stem cells, researchers grow 3-D retinal tissue that can sense light. 

0 Comments

image: BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

By | June 9, 2014

An advisory committee for the BRAIN Initiative says that to fully fund the goals of the neuroscience research program, taxpayers should fork over $4.5 billion.

0 Comments

image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2014

Proof, Caffeinated, A Sting in the Tale, and The Insect Cookbook

0 Comments

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