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image: Retinal Film Detects Light

Retinal Film Detects Light

By | November 13, 2014

A new light-sensitive nanotube-based film could pave the way to more flexible and durable retinal implants.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

By | October 15, 2014

The brain’s ability to make new neural connections can be restored in mice by blocking a protein that normally acts as a natural brake on neuroplasticity. 

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image: The Eye

The Eye

By | October 1, 2014

An overview of visual processing

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image: The Bionic Eye

The Bionic Eye

By | October 1, 2014

Using the latest technologies, researchers are constructing novel prosthetic devices to restore vision in the blind.

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image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

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image: An Eye for Detail

An Eye for Detail

By | October 1, 2014

Vision researcher John Dowling has spent a lifetime studying the neural architecture of the retina. He is closing his laboratory after 53 years, opting to extend these studies as a postdoc.

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image: Cone Cell Correctors

Cone Cell Correctors

By | October 1, 2014

In mice, adult cone cell outer segments and their visual functions deteriorate if two microRNAs are not present.

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image: Guiding Light

Guiding Light

By | October 1, 2014

Retinal glial cells acting as optical fibers shuttle longer wavelengths of light to individual cones.

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image: Inside the Color Lab

Inside the Color Lab

By | October 1, 2014

Meet the University of Washington's Jay Neitz, who studies the evolution of color vision.

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