The Scientist

» vision and immunology

Most Recent

image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

0 Comments

image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

0 Comments

image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

3 Comments

image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

2 Comments

image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

5 Comments

image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

2 Comments

image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

0 Comments

image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

4 Comments

image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

1 Comment

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. New Lyme Disease Test Developed by Summer Student
  2. Caloric Restriction Turns White Fat Brown
  3. The Neanderthal in the Mirror
    Reading Frames The Neanderthal in the Mirror

    Our evolutionary cousin is no longer a blundering caveman. Recent research has painted a picture of a human ancestor with culture, art, and advanced cognitive skills.

  4. How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy
RayBiotech