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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Upgraded Photoswitch for Vision Repair

Upgraded Photoswitch for Vision Repair

By | April 13, 2017

Researchers improve on a technique to use a light-stimulated small molecule to confer longer-term photosensitivity to the retinal cells of blind mice.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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By converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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image: Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

Image of the Day: Tail Eyes

By | April 3, 2017

Following treatment with a migraine drug, blind tadpoles were able to process visual information through eyes transplanted onto their tails.

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image: Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

By | March 30, 2017

Two chips implanted in a quadriplegic patient’s motor cortex and 36 electrodes in his right arm allow the man to control the movement of his right arm and hand.

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The University of Rhode Island neurotoxicologist and dean came to the U.S. for college in the 1980s. 

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