The Scientist

» vision, developmental biology and evolution

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image: The Bionic Eye

The Bionic Eye

By | October 1, 2014

Using the latest technologies, researchers are constructing novel prosthetic devices to restore vision in the blind.

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image: A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

A Visionary’s Poor Vision, 1685

By | October 1, 2014

William Briggs’s theory of optic nerve architecture was unusual and incorrect, but years later it led to Isaac Newton’s explanation of binocular vision.

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image: An Eye for Detail

An Eye for Detail

By | October 1, 2014

Vision researcher John Dowling has spent a lifetime studying the neural architecture of the retina. He is closing his laboratory after 53 years, opting to extend these studies as a postdoc.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Unnatural Selection</em>

Book Excerpt from Unnatural Selection

By | October 1, 2014

In chapter 5, “Resurgence: Bedbugs Bite Back,” author Emily Monosson chronicles the rise of the pesky pests in the face of humanity’s best chemical efforts.

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image: Cone Cell Correctors

Cone Cell Correctors

By | October 1, 2014

In mice, adult cone cell outer segments and their visual functions deteriorate if two microRNAs are not present.

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image: Guiding Light

Guiding Light

By | October 1, 2014

Retinal glial cells acting as optical fibers shuttle longer wavelengths of light to individual cones.

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image: Inside the Color Lab

Inside the Color Lab

By | October 1, 2014

Meet the University of Washington's Jay Neitz, who studies the evolution of color vision.

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image: Let There Be Sight

Let There Be Sight

By | October 1, 2014

Hear from Diane Ashworth, one of the world’s first recipients of a bionic eye implant.

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image: Predator Demoted

Predator Demoted

By | October 1, 2014

Extinct, giant arthropods, long assumed to be top predators of ancient seas, didn’t have sharp enough eyesight to be refined hunters.

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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

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