The Scientist

» vision and developmental biology

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image: Guiding Light

Guiding Light

By | October 1, 2014

Retinal glial cells acting as optical fibers shuttle longer wavelengths of light to individual cones.

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image: Inside the Color Lab

Inside the Color Lab

By | October 1, 2014

Meet the University of Washington's Jay Neitz, who studies the evolution of color vision.

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image: Let There Be Sight

Let There Be Sight

By | October 1, 2014

Hear from Diane Ashworth, one of the world’s first recipients of a bionic eye implant.

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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

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image: Robo Retina

Robo Retina

By | October 1, 2014

Learn about the photovoltaic retinal prosthesis from one of its developers, Daniel Palanker of Stanford University.

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image: Sound and Light Show

Sound and Light Show

By | October 1, 2014

Sounds trigger a response in the visual cortex that predicts how accurately a person can identify a visual target.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Rainbow Connection

The Rainbow Connection

By | October 1, 2014

Color vision as we know it resulted from one fortuitous genetic event after another.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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