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image: A Spider's Eye View

A Spider's Eye View

By | April 1, 2015

Cornell researchers probe the brains of jumping spiders to gain insight into the arachnid's visual processing capabilities.

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image: Through a Spider’s Eyes

Through a Spider’s Eyes

By | April 1, 2015

Deciphering how a jumping spider sees the world and processes visual information may yield insights into long-standing robotics problems.

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image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Seeing Red

Seeing Red

By | February 1, 2015

Scientists attempt to work out how humans are able to see in the infrared.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: From the Feature Well

From the Feature Well

By | December 30, 2014

A review of The Scientist’s 2014 special issues, highlighting trending areas of research across the life sciences

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

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image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

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