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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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image: Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

By | March 31, 2016

Boston-based Commense plans to develop microbial and nonmicrobial interventions aimed at improving child health.

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image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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image: Pregnancy Stress Can Affect Offspring’s Microbiomes

Pregnancy Stress Can Affect Offspring’s Microbiomes

By | June 17, 2015

A study in mice suggests stress during pregnancy can affect offspring's microbiota and brain metabolism.

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image: Parsing the Penis Microbiome

Parsing the Penis Microbiome

By | May 29, 2014

Circumcision and sexual activity are but two factors that can influence the bacterial communities that inhabit male genitalia.

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image: Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

By | May 19, 2014

The overly simplistic notion of a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiome is giving way to an appreciation of diverse and dynamic bacterial communities.

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