The Scientist

» epigenetics and microbiology

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Epigenetic Effects of Mom’s Diet

Epigenetic Effects of Mom’s Diet

By | April 29, 2014

Molecular markers of a mother’s nutrition around the time of conception can be found in her child’s DNA.

4 Comments

image: Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

Microbe’s Diversity Is Vast, Ancient

By | April 24, 2014

A marine cyanobacterium possesses astounding genomic diversity, yet still organizes into distinct subpopulations that have likely persisted for ages.

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image: Money Microbiome

Money Microbiome

By | April 24, 2014

Swabbing cash circulating in New York City reveals more than 3,000 different types of bacteria.

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image: Microbiome Influences

Microbiome Influences

By | April 22, 2014

Researchers find that gender, education level, and breastfeeding can affect humans’ commensal microbial communities.

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image: Week in Review: April 14–18

Week in Review: April 14–18

By | April 18, 2014

Genome-wide effects of trisomy 21; RNA-based signs of transgenerational stress; depression and resilience; a call to overhaul US biomedical research system

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image: Traces of Trauma in Sperm RNA

Traces of Trauma in Sperm RNA

By | April 13, 2014

A mouse study shows that molecular remnants of early-life stress can be passed on to future generations.

3 Comments

image: Epigenetic Cancer Therapy Clears Phase I

Epigenetic Cancer Therapy Clears Phase I

By | April 7, 2014

Investigational drug that inhibits proteins involved with epigenetic regulation shows activity against certain blood cancers in an early-stage clinical trial.

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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