The Scientist

» epigenetics, neuroscience and ecology

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Flavor Savors

Flavor Savors

By | January 1, 2016

Odors experienced via the mouth are essential to our sense of taste.

2 Comments

image: Logically Illogical

Logically Illogical

By | January 1, 2016

The most bizarre behaviors often make perfect sense in the minds of the mentally ill.

3 Comments

image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

1 Comment

image: RNA Epigenetics

RNA Epigenetics

By , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

8 Comments

image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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image: Legacies Left Behind in 2015

Legacies Left Behind in 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A look at the contributions of some of the prominent researchers who died this year

3 Comments

image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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