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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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image: An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

An Epigenetic Aging Clock for Mice

By | April 21, 2017

Scientists predict rodents’ ages by assessing DNA methylation markers in various tissues.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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image: Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

Gel Scaffolds for Delivery of Immunotherapies

By | April 1, 2017

Using biocompatible polymers to carry cancer immune therapies directly to the tumor

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