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» epigenetics, immunology and microbiology

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

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image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

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image: Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

By | July 17, 2017

When kept at warmer temperatures for five generations, C. elegans showed evidence of “remembering” that experience for up to 14 generations.

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

By | June 30, 2017

Transfer RNA fragments prevent jumping genes from hopping around in the mouse embryo, when histone methylation can’t do the job.

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

ASM to Discontinue Small Conferences

By | June 6, 2017

Numerous scientists are disappointed with the American Society for Microbiology’s decision, and some are hatching plans to keep the meetings alive.

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