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image: Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

Epigenetic Inheritance in Nematodes

By | July 17, 2017

The memory of a temperature spike can persist for as many as 14 generations in C. elegans.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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image: Endocannabinoids in the Groove

Endocannabinoids in the Groove

By | July 17, 2017

The system responsible for the buzz humans get from marijuana plays a passel of physiological roles outside the brain.

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image: Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

By | July 17, 2017

When kept at warmer temperatures for five generations, C. elegans showed evidence of “remembering” that experience for up to 14 generations.

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image: RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

By | June 30, 2017

Transfer RNA fragments prevent jumping genes from hopping around in the mouse embryo, when histone methylation can’t do the job.

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image: Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

By | June 29, 2017

A small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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