The Scientist

» epigenetics, immunology and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Diseased Heart Chip

Diseased Heart Chip

By | May 12, 2014

In the latest iteration of organ-on-a-chip technology, researchers develop an in vitro model of functioning human heart tissue with an inherited cardiovascular disease.

0 Comments

image: Half Genes, Half Environment

Half Genes, Half Environment

By | May 5, 2014

Examining more than 20 years of Swedish birth records, researchers determine that autism risk is influenced equally by genetic and environmental factors.

3 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Primordial Sperm

Lab-Grown Primordial Sperm

By | May 2, 2014

Scientists have reprogrammed human skin cells into immature sperm cells.

0 Comments

Scientists urge the World Health Organization to delay destroying the last remaining laboratory stocks of live variola virus because there’s more research to be done.

1 Comment

image: It’s an Antibiotic-Resistant World

It’s an Antibiotic-Resistant World

By | May 1, 2014

Bacteria all over the globe are evolving tricks to survive humanity’s arsenal of antibiotics, and the World Health Organization has officially sounded the alarm.

0 Comments

image: Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

Cell Transplants for Heart Questioned

By | May 1, 2014

A report reveals that using bone marrow stem cells to treat heart disease is less promising than a decade of research has let on.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

0 Comments

image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

0 Comments

image: The Energizer

The Energizer

By | May 1, 2014

György Hajnóczky uncovers the chemical and physical strategies by which mitochondria communicate and function within a cell.

3 Comments

image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Optimism for Key Deer After Hurricane Irma
  2. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  3. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  4. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

AAAS