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» epigenetics, immunology and ecology

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image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

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image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Methylation Tied to Alzheimer’s

Methylation Tied to Alzheimer’s

By | August 20, 2014

People with the neurodegenerative disease are more likely to have certain epigenetic patterns than those without.

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image: Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

Pregnancy Stress Spans Generations

By | August 7, 2014

The stressors a female rat experiences during pregnancy can have repercussions for her granddaughters, a study shows. 

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: A Blood-based Biomarker for Suicide?

A Blood-based Biomarker for Suicide?

By | July 31, 2014

Epigenetic and genetic changes in the SKA2 gene are correlated with suicidal behaviors, researchers show.

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image: Epigenetic Changes Can Cause Cancer

Epigenetic Changes Can Cause Cancer

By | July 25, 2014

A transgene designed to attract methylation to the promoter of a tumor-suppressor gene leads to tumorigenesis in a mouse model. 

4 Comments

image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

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image: Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

By | July 23, 2014

A former graduate student says he feels slighted by a failure to attribute his contributions to a line of research regarding the salinity tolerances of an invasive species.

15 Comments

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