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» epigenetics, immunology and evolution

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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image: Methylation Maestro

Methylation Maestro

By | January 1, 2017

After initially discovering that DNA methylation represses transcription, Howard Cedar continues to explore how the epigenetic mark regulates gene expression.

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The public may still believe that male-specific traits, such as high testosterone levels, lead to many of the gender inequalities that exist in society, but science tells a different story.

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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image: Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

By | December 29, 2016

Audio recordings of bats hashing out disputes reveals that their calls are laden with information about identity and intent.

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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Standard taxonomy lumps together bird species that should be separate, a new study suggests, raising the total number of estimated species from 9,000 to 18,000.

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image: Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Show Signs of Donor Age

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Show Signs of Donor Age

By | December 12, 2016

iPSCs created through the reprogramming of human somatic cells retain genomic marks of the donor’s age.

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image: A Tale of Two Tails

A Tale of Two Tails

By | December 7, 2016

An analysis of ancient fish fossils suggests that mammalian and fish tails are fundamentally different structures, each with unique evolutionary histories.

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