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image: RNA Methylation Dynamics

RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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image: Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

By | December 21, 2015

Health officials suspect recently reported cases of the disease in Liberia might stem from a flare-up of the virus in a survivor who became pregnant.

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image: When the Flu Vax Fails

When the Flu Vax Fails

By | December 16, 2015

The status of a person’s immune system can predict when a seasonal flu vaccination will not provide sufficient protection, according to a study. 

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image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

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image: Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

Obesity Alters Sperm Epigenome

By | December 3, 2015

Moderately obese men display different epigenetic marks on their sperm than lean men, and bariatric surgery in massively obese men correlated with changes in sperm methylation.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Ghosts in the Genome

Ghosts in the Genome

By | December 1, 2015

How one generation’s experience can affect the next

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image: Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

Ebola’s Effects on the Eye

By | November 30, 2015

A second doctor shows symptoms of ocular disease after recovering from Ebola infection.

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image: Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes

By | November 25, 2015

Molecular markers could aid researchers’ assessment of patient response to the drug.  

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image: Birth of the Skin Microbiome

Birth of the Skin Microbiome

By | November 17, 2015

The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

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