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image: Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

By | October 8, 2015

In a small study of male twins, nine methylation sites helped researchers predict a person’s sexual orientation.

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image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

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image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By , , and | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

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image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

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image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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