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image: Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

Worms’ Epigenetic Memories

By | July 17, 2017

When kept at warmer temperatures for five generations, C. elegans showed evidence of “remembering” that experience for up to 14 generations.

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image: Cell Cannibalism as Cancer Defense

Cell Cannibalism as Cancer Defense

By | July 11, 2017

A new study suggests that the mysterious process by which one cell consumes another may be triggered by cell division, potentially helping to fight tumor growth.

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image: RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

RNA Protects “Naked” Genomes from Retrotransposons

By | June 30, 2017

Transfer RNA fragments prevent jumping genes from hopping around in the mouse embryo, when histone methylation can’t do the job.

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The cell-surface receptor, SIRP-alpha, initiates the innate immune response in hosts.  

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Image of the Day: Memory Maker

Image of the Day: Memory Maker

By | June 2, 2017

The enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 turns on memory-building genes within the nuclei of hippocampal neurons. 

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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