The Scientist

» epigenetics and cell & molecular biology

Most Recent

image: Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

Newest Life Science Additions to the Dictionary

By | February 8, 2017

Need help explaining CRISPR, epigenome, or rock snot? The Merriam-Webster dictionary has you covered.

0 Comments

image: Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

Artificial Cells Talk to Real Ones

By | February 1, 2017

Nonliving cells developed in the lab can communicate chemically with living bacteria, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: In Praise of McClintock

In Praise of McClintock

By | February 1, 2017

Robert Martienssen, who studies plant epigenetics at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, discusses the brilliance of pioneering geneticist Barbara McClintock, with whom he worked before her death in 1992.

0 Comments

image: Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

Plant Photoreceptor Doubles as a Thermometer

By | February 1, 2017

Warmth acts on a light-sensing protein similarly to the way shade does, setting off a growth spurt in plant seedlings.

0 Comments

image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

2 Comments

image: Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

Infographic: Dual-Purpose Photoreceptor

By | February 1, 2017

See how different environmental conditions affect the activity of a molecule sensitive to both light and temperature.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Following the Force

Infographic: Following the Force

By | February 1, 2017

Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

By | February 1, 2017

Multiple molecular mechanisms keep plant DNA methylation in order.

0 Comments

image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

6 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Coral to Outlast Climate Change
  2. Antarctica Is Turning Green
  3. First In Vivo Human Genome Editing to Be Tested in New Clinical Trial
  4. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
AAAS