The Scientist

» epigenetics and cell & molecular biology

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image: Don’t Fear DIYbio

Don’t Fear DIYbio

By | November 19, 2013

Biological tinkerers are not the risk that some have made them out to be, according to a new report.

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image: Depression Speeds Aging

Depression Speeds Aging

By | November 12, 2013

Cells in the bodies of depressed people appear older and contain chromosomes with shorter telomeres.

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image: The Epigenetics of Drug Abuse

The Epigenetics of Drug Abuse

By | November 11, 2013

At the Society for Neuroscience conference, researchers present results linking the epigenome to heroin and cocaine addiction.

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image: Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

Decoding Breast Cancer Drug Resistance

By | November 3, 2013

Common mutations in metastasized breast tumors suggest how the cancer can develop resistance to frontline drugs.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Brave Genius</em>

Book Excerpt from Brave Genius

By | November 1, 2013

In Chapter 20, “On the Same Path,” author Sean Carroll describes the initial meeting between Nobel Laureates Jacques Monod and Albert Camus.

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Chance and Necessity

By | November 1, 2013

War and justice brought together two of the greatest minds of the 20th century, a scientist and a writer.

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Penetrating the Brain

Penetrating the Brain

By | November 1, 2013

Researchers use molecular keys, chisels, and crowbars to open the last great biochemical barricade in the body—the blood-brain barrier.

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image: Evolving Pain Resistance

Evolving Pain Resistance

By | October 24, 2013

Grasshopper mice harbor mutations in a pain-transmitting sodium channel that allow them to prey on highly toxic bark scorpions.

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image: Clocking Epigenetics

Clocking Epigenetics

By | October 22, 2013

DNA methylation status can predict age in various human tissues, a study shows.

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