The Scientist

» epigenetics and developmental biology

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Female Brain Maintained by Methylation

Female Brain Maintained by Methylation

By | March 30, 2015

Development of female sexual behaviors requires DNA methylation in the preoptic area of the rodent brain. 

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

Weiwei Dang: Epigenetics in Aging

By | March 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Huffington Center On Aging, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 38

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image: How We Age

How We Age

By | March 1, 2015

From DNA damage to cellular miscommunication, aging is a mysterious and multifarious process.

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image: Exploring the Epigenome

Exploring the Epigenome

By | February 18, 2015

A National Institutes of Health-funded consortium publishes 111 reference maps of DNA and histone marks.

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image: Culturing Changes Cells

Culturing Changes Cells

By | February 3, 2015

Within days of their transfer to a dish, a certain epigenetic mark vanishes from mouse cells.

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image: Methylation Predicts Mortality

Methylation Predicts Mortality

By | February 3, 2015

A study finds a link between patterns of methylation in the human genome and people’s life span.

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image: Pushing the Limits

Pushing the Limits

By | February 1, 2015

A guide to the newest techniques for examining epigenetics in single cells

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

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