The Scientist

» epigenetics and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Weight's the Matter?

Weight's the Matter?

By | November 1, 2015

The causes and consequences of obesity are more complicated than we thought.  

0 Comments

image: Tethering Transposons

Tethering Transposons

By | October 15, 2015

Panoramix, a newly identified transcription repressor, takes the bounce out of jumping genes.

1 Comment

image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

0 Comments

image: Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

Epigenetic Marks Tied to Homosexuality

By | October 8, 2015

In a small study of male twins, nine methylation sites helped researchers predict a person’s sexual orientation.

1 Comment

image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

0 Comments

image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

1 Comment

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

0 Comments

image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By , and | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
RayBiotech