The Scientist

» epigenetics and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

0 Comments

image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

Opinion: Engineering the Epigenome

By , , and | August 26, 2015

The use of targetable chromatin modifiers has ushered in a new era of functional epigenomics.

1 Comment

image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Leaving an Imprint

Leaving an Imprint

By | August 1, 2015

Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.

1 Comment

image: Messages in the Noise

Messages in the Noise

By | August 1, 2015

After spending more than a decade developing tools to study patterns in gene sequences, bioinformaticians are now working on programs to analyze epigenomics data.

0 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

0 Comments

image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Scientists Activate Predatory Instinct in Mice
  2. National Academies Detail the State of Weed Science
  3. Superbug Resistant to Every Antibiotic in the U.S. Killed Nevada Woman
  4. Trumping Science: Part III
    The Nutshell Trumping Science: Part III

    Scientists criticize unconfirmed reports that President-elect Donald Trump has asked Robert Kennedy Jr., an anti-vaccine activist, to investigate vaccine safety.

RayBiotech